Do Suana Suits Help You Lose Weight?

Hi Davey,

What are your thoughts on the use of sauna suits and toning wraps while working out? Do they help you lose weight?

Regards,
Jerry

4731Hey Jerry,

Let’s dive right into it. Do sauna suits and the like help you lose weight? Yes. But not really.

First, let’s differentiate between losing weight and losing body fat. Losing weight can happen for a variety of reasons. If you become less muscular, you lose weight. Heck, if you amputate a limb, you lose weight. Losing body fat, on the other hand, is very specific. When most of us talk about losing weight, we’re really just using an inaccurate synonym for fat loss.

Having made that distinction, let’s talk about sauna suits. They’re made of waterproof fabric and cause the wearer to sweat profusely. Because the waterproof fabric blocks evaporation, the body isn’t able to cool properly. As a result, more sweat is produced.

Indeed, sauna suits will help you lose weight. But weight loss doesn’t mean fat loss. By hijacking your body’s natural cooling system through a sauna suit, you really only lose water weight. Once you rehydrate, the weight comes right back on.

It’s also worth noting that sauna suits are actually quite dangerous. After all, your body cools itself for a reason. Through excessive sweating and increases in the body’s core temperature, dehydration and heat stroke could result. In addition, there have been many reported cases of fainting, weakness and even heart attacks from sauna suits.

Love,
Davey

P.S. If you’re actually looking to decrease body fat, I recommend The Davey Wavey Weight Loss Program. Rather than gimmicks or tricks, the program is based on real science and rooted in practicality.

 

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Developing Elite Gymnastic Strength: Upper Body and Core

Cycle six of the gymnastics workout program concentrates on upper body and core strength with some unilateral leg exercises worked in.

Week 1

Day 1

Handstand balance work – 15 minutes

 

Cycle six of the gymnastics workout program concentrates on upper body and core strength with some unilateral leg exercises worked in. This cycle applies the rolls and balance work we have done in past cycles to more than just the floor and strikes a good balance between basic skill and strength work.

 

For more videos of the movements in these workouts, visit the Breaking Muscle Youtube channel and the CrossFit EST Youtube channel.

 

Post your workout results, comments, and questions to the Breaking Muscle forum.

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Heal Your TMJ Disorder With 3 Simple Posture Exercises

It may seem crazy, but there is a documented relationship between TMJ disorder and posture – check this out.

If you have been dealing with symptoms of TMJ disorder, you can’t afford not to read this article. In my training, I was taught that TMJ disorder is caused by bad posture, but I have been skeptical until now. In a recent experience working with my mom, she was able to eliminate her jaw pain through the use of postural corrective exercise. I am now a believer.

 

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5 Sneaky Ways to Exercise During a Long Day at Work

Whether you are stuck at work or just got home from a long day, these movements are a great addition to your daily agenda to help keep you active and strong.

So, you're pressed for time or too tired before or after your workday to exercise? Maybe there was a point in time when you were exercising regularly. But now you're at a place in your life where family, work commitments, or both have taken priority, making it tough for you to get to the gym.

 

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Skinny Creamy Chicken Enchiladas

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skinny white creamy chicken enchiladas tone tighten

So if you couldn’t tell by now, I’m a HUGE fan of Mexican food! One of my favorites is this spin on enchiladas – you make a white cream sauce with chicken, roll ‘em up and bake ‘em. They are PHENOMENAL! Seriously so good; but maybe not exactly the best thing for you. A few years ago I set out to make this recipe a little healthier without sacrificing any of the flavor. After some trial and error what I got was, well, AMAZING! All of the flavor with half of the fat and calories! Today I wanted to share with you the fruits of my labors – hope you enjoy these “Low Fat Creamy Chicken Enchiladas” as much as I do!

Ingredients
4 chicken breasts, cooked and cubed

1/2 C low-sodium chicken broth
1 (4 oz) can green chilies, chopped
1/4 C chopped green or yellow onion
2 1/2 C cream of chicken soup (equivalent = 2 cans, but I prefer my homemade recipe here)
1 C plain Greek yogurt
1 C grated cheddar cheese
1 can (15 ounce) black beans
Whole wheat tortillas (10-12 soft-taco size)

Directions
Mix broth, chilies, onion, soup, Greek yogurt and 1/4 C grated cheese in large bowl. Set aside ~1 C of this mixture to go on top of the enchiladas at the end. Add cubed chicken and black beans. Stir until well-combined. Distribute 3 T chicken mixture lengthwise in a tortilla and roll enchilada style. I combine a little more chicken broth with the 1 C of the mixture to make it a little thinner; use ~1/4 C to coat the bottom of a greased 9×13 pan. Place rolled enchilada on top of sauce and repeat for as many tortillas / mixture will allow (usually 8-10 depending on how full you stuff them). Distribute remaining 3/4 C sauce evenly over the top of the enchiladas and sprinkle remaining 3/4 C grated cheese on top. Bake 20-25 minutes at 350 degrees. I like to top them off with lettuce, avocado, diced tomatoes, and my famous homemade salsa!

Looking for more healthy and delicious recipes? CLICK HERE to be taken to our recipe index where you’ll find dozens of healthy appetizers, main dishes, and desserts!

Make it happen,

Jared

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The Definitive Guide to Unsolicited Advice at the Gym.

don't breatheUnsolicited advice at the gym. You almost always know when it’s going to happen. First, you feel their eyes watching you. Second, you feel them come up next to you. Third, you hear, “Excuse me, but…” followed by a (probably) well-intentioned but totally uninvited suggestion.

Excuse me, but did you know that you are squatting too low?

Excuse me, but you really need to keep your shoulders up when you run.

Excuse me, but you shouldn’t train two body parts per day because your protein gets confused and doesn’t know where to go.

Excuse me, but stop.

The first thing to know about unsolicited advice is to not give it. Why? Because not everyone agrees on the best way to exercise, and the individual may actually be following the advice of their trainer or doctor. Because you may actually embarrass someone who is already uncomfortable or insecure about exercising in front of strangers. Because they’re probably going to think you are a dick, and won’t listen to you.

dwfHaving said that, there is one exception. It’s appropriate to intervene if – and only if – the person is doing something that’s potentially dangerous. In this instance, notify a gym employee of the situation – and let that person step in and do their job.

The second thing to know about unsolicited advice is how to respond when you receive it. The truth is, most of us don’t like receiving fitness advice from strangers. We tend to take such instances personally, but remember that it usually comes from a good place. Here are a few suggestions:

  • Laugh it off. I know of someone who says, “Thanks, but I’m trying to stay amateur. I’m not trying to go pro.” And then get on with your workout.
  • Listen to it. Sometimes they might actually have a point. For example, I had someone point out that I was cheating on my barbell bicep curls by using momentum. In fact, I was. I didn’t like receiving the advice, but I knew he was right. And I adjusted myself accordingly.
  • Smile and say no thanks. If being more direct is your style, just smile and say, “Thanks, but I’m training for something specific,” or “Thank you but I’m good.” Most people will get the hint and move on.

In the comments below, I’d love to hear your approach to unsolicited gym advice. Do you think it’s appropriate to give it? How do you respond when you receive it?

P.S. For some very solicited advice on building mass, download Size Matters: Davey Wavey’s Foolproof Guide to Building Muscle. It’s a simple, step-by-step guide to building muscle and increasing strength.

 

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Testing Your Maxes: Smart Strength With Charles Staley

Strength training veteran Charles Staley is here to answer our readers’ questions about life and lifting.

Note: Charles is here on a weekly basis to help you cut through the B.S. and get to the bottom of the biggest questions in health and training. Post your questions via social media or in the comments section below to participate in next week's mailbag.

 

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